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Aaron Boeder

Transcript:

Every day you push on different types of cases so that you can resolve them in the best way possible for your clients.

I’m Aaron Boeder. I’m one of the attorneys at Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard.

I served in the army, and I spent some time in Kosovo. Over there, people couldn’t rely on the government or institutions like we have here, court systems, in order to have their rights preserved. We have so many institutions here that can protect a person’s rights, and lawyers are one of the most important parts of that process. So, it really got me interested, and I thought more about it, and I pursued law school after my time in the army.

I love coming to work every morning because I get to work on so many different types of cases, and you get to work with people who are really dedicated. So, I get to learn new things, I get to learn about new people, and hopefully, I help a lot of people on a daily basis. And it doesn’t matter what background my clients come from, when we go into court, they have an opportunity to have their case heard and decided by a jury of 12 people.

We represented a middle-aged mother of two children, and she was a very successful executive, and she had a medical condition that caused her to have a stroke. She went to a hospital, and they did not institute appropriate treatment quick enough to reverse the effects of the stroke, so she had long-term permanent disability. As a young father who’s trying to be very successful, it really impacted me a lot, to see how her life could change so dramatically with one medical condition. Thankfully, we were able to resolve her case for enough money that she was able to pursue other volunteer activities and not have to worry about the finances associated with raising her children.

You form a bond. Your clients tell you things that they probably do not tell their family or other people. Sometimes, I don’t wanna know everything that they tell me, but that’s just part of the job. When we go on trial, we spend 10, 12 hours a day with them, and you get to know about their family, you get to know about their lives, you get to know about what they want after the case is over, and you really try to help them as much as possible.